Information for Medical Profession

Medical doctors and chiropractors have a long history of division between their professions. One of my goals has been to build a bridge of knowledge between us. I am the only chiropractor in the state to work out of a hospital's medical facility. I have given talks at the I.U. school of medicine's freshman class, and I.U. residents have shadowed me at my office. It has been very gratifying and the students have been fantastic. Several of the students even became patients of mine after seeing some of my patients progress.

According to peer review research over the past 20 years, skilled spinal manipulation has emerged as the gold standard for acute and chronic low back pain. It is the safest and most effective form of treatment, and when combined with rehab exercises, it lasts by far the longest. Most back pain is caused by decreased joint function in the spine and the corresponding muscle condition. Altered function of these joints causes irritation, which in turn causes inflammation and pain. Spinal manipulation can restore proper function to the spine, which translates into a patient having increased joint function and less pain.

I want to bring the art and science of spinal manipulation into its proper place in medicine. Millions of additional people could benefit from its unique approach.

I decided to become a chiropractor when I was 16 years old, because it worked so well for me after a football injury. That is the beauty of spinal manipulation, a patient should see positive results within 2-3 weeks of initiating care. If a patient does not see a positive change in this time period, they should be referred for a second opinion.

The average number of visits a patient requires typically 6-12. Stretching and strengthening exercises are also very important to decrease recurrences.

Spinal manipulation should be embraced and utilized more. Over 90% of manipulation is performed by chiropractors. There is much involved in adjusting someone's spine and chiropractors have the most training. In school and today, I have always had one goal "Doing what's best for the patient".

References
1. Merde TW, etal, Randomized comparison of Chiropractic and Hospital Outpatient Management for Low Back Pain: Results from Extended Follow Up. BMJ, 1995, Vol. 311 p 349-351

2. Bigos SJ, Chair, Acute Low Back Problems in Adults, AHCPR Clinical Practice Guidlines. U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, 1995.